The WSCL Blog

News and information about WSCL's Classical Music Programming

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Today's Music ... and Films

It happens that today we've aired several works that are prominent in film scores, and mentioned others. I thought you might like to see the names again, and perhaps view the films again with an ear toward the music and how it sets the tone.

A PLACE IN THE SUN suite
Composer: Franz Waxman (who wrote so many scores for Hitchcock films)
John Williams conducting the London Symphony Orchestra
The Film: A Place In the Sun (1951 w/ Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift)
A film of youthful angst rebelling against societal norms, and the romance of a brash confused youth with the unbelievably beautiful young socialite.

NOCTURNE: Clouds, Festivals, and Sirens
Composer: Claude Debussy
Jun Markl conducting the National Orchestra of Lyon
The Film: Portrait of Jenny (1948 B&W w/ Joseph Cotton and Jennifer Jones)
A purely magical romance that blends winter landscapes, stormy seas, ghosts, time travel, fine art, and music into a transporting work of art. (At many points in the film a lens effect is used to make the film itself look as if it were printed on canvas.) This, and other works of Debussy are used extensively and woven throughout the film.

"Portrait of Jenny" brought to mind two other great pairings of mystery, romance, time travel (and music):

Somewhere in Time (1980 w/ Jane Seymour and Christopher Reeve)- which relys heavily on Rachmaninov's Variations on a theme of Paganini
and
Peter Ibbetson (1935 B&W w/ Gary Cooper and Ann Harding) - the early prototype for time and location travel through love (and art - including archetecture)!

Do you know of any other magical combinations where music carries a romantic film? Please share them with us here in the comments!

Kara Russell, Classical Music Host

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