The WSCL Blog

News and information about WSCL's Classical Music Programming

Friday, March 25, 2011

JUST OPENED - Friday March 25, 2011



BRAHMS
Zuill Bailey, cello, Awadagin Pratt, piano
TELARC 32664
Two of the hottest artists in the classical music world team up to bring us a great variety of the works of Brahms, written for piano and cello. A variety of Sonnets, songs, and larger works display the range of Brahms and this duo.

DEBUSSY: Le Martyre de Saint Sebastien
National Orchestra of Lyon, Jun Markl, cond.
NAXOS 572297
Debussy wrote music for the controversial work of Gabrielle D'Annunzio, "The Martyrdom of Saint Sebastian." Controversial because it combined the biblical figure of Saint Sebastian with the greek myth of Adonis, hightening the homo-erotic interest of the story, then he had his current mistress play the Saint herself. D'Annunzio's work was known for illustrating "the voluptuous life" of the late 1800s and turn of the century, and this production was not only forbidden to all Catholics by the Pope, but it was the last straw that led to the Pope putting all of D'Annunzio's writing on the Index of Forbidden Books. Debussy's music is fittingly dark and experimental in this work, less melody driven. Also on this CD are several other works written for dance and other stage works - the delicious variety of Debussy.



CHOPIN: The Complete Works, Vol. 2
Ian Hobson, piano
ZEPHYR 133-09
Hobson continues his tribute to Chopin with this Volume 2. Small dances and other morcels set off larger works relief.



BRUCKNER: Symphony No. 8
Mozarteumorchester, Ivor Bolton, cond.
OEHMS CLASSICS 751

Bruckner's symphony is darkly romantic and evokes yearning and struggle to achieve.




NEW ARTS TRIO at Chatagua
FLEUR DE SON Classics 58000
This revered piano trio who have a history of playing at the renowned Chatagua Summer Sessions provide us a sampling of the esoteric modern works inspired by a futeristic quasi-religious fable and another by philosphy, and a more tratitional trio for piano, violin and cello by Dvorak, and the always tempting rhythms of Piazzolla.



We hope you enjoied these, and I'll be sharing more new releases with you next week
on JUST OPENED, Friday at 1PM.
Kara Dahl Russell



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